Blood flow-restricted training does not improve jump performance in untrained young men
Posted: 21 December 2011 09:43 PM   [ Ignore ]  
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http://www.akademiai.com/content/41m2j527640h32g6/

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of blood flow-restricted training (BFRT) on jump performance in relation to changes in muscle strength. Seventeen untrained young men were assigned into either BFRT or normal training (NORT) groups and performed low-intensity [30–40% of one-repetition maximum (1RM)] resistance exercise (horizontal squat, 3–4 sets × 15–30 repetitions) twice a week for 10 weeks. The BFRT performed the exercise with their proximal thighs compressed by air-pressure cuffs for the purpose of blood flow restriction. Squat 1RM, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of quadriceps femoris, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height were measured before and after the 10-wk training period. Squat 1RM increased greater in BFRT than in NORT (19.3% vs. 9.7%, P < 0.01). Although the CSA increase was independent of groups, it tended to be larger in BFRT than in NORT (8.3% vs. 2.9%, P = 0.094). On the other hand, CMJ height did not change after the training (P = 0.51). In conclusion, the present study showed that BFRT induced muscle hypertrophy and strength increase, whereas it did not increase CMJ height in previously untrained young men. It is suggested that BFRT is ineffective in improving jump performance.

(I am not sure from this abstract what type of training the normal training group performed. Both could have used lower loads)

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